Direkt zum Inhalt springen
login.png Login    |
de | en
MyTUM-Portal
Technische Universität München

Technische Universität München

Feedback



Ist diese Seite veraltet oder sind die Informationen falsch?

Faszination Forschung Ausgabe 19

Inhalt

    Editorial

  • Editorial
    Neuroscience is a domain of excellence on our medical research agenda. At TUM, basic and clinical research are close companions rather than poles apart. As a technical university offering a highly differentiated range of subjects, we look to the future by networking neuroscience with other disciplines such as informatics and engineering, thus enabling a holistic approach to research. This concept also resonated with the international experts commissioned by the Klaus Tschira Foundation to consider funding for a multiple sclerosis research center: their decision was a clear vote in favor of TUM. As a result, we are now investing their donation of 25 million euros in a brand new building to house our research into this autoimmune disease, which has such a complex impact on the nervous system.
  • Multiple Sclerosis

  • Collaboration Hub for Clinicians and Basic Researchers
    TUM is building a new research and treatment center for multiple sclerosis (TUM-MS) – at a cost of 35 million euros. The center will bring together the numerous research groups at TUM dedicated to this – as yet incurable – disease. Clinicians and basic researchers will work in close collaboration under one roof to ensure new findings are quickly translated into clinical trials. At present, TUM’s university hospital, Klinikum rechts der Isar, already cares for 1,000 MS patients each year. This major project is made possible by a donation of 25 million euros from the Klaus Tschira Foundation, a German charity established by physicist Klaus Tschira, and by additional support from the Bavarian state. Collaboration Hub for Clinicians and Basic Researchers 8 Faszination
  • Multiple Sclerosis – Immunology

  • New Treatment Options for MS Patients
    In multiple sclerosis (MS), B cells play a decisive role in the onset of disease. An international study – involving researchers from TUM – has demonstrated that a newly developed drug targeting these immune cells is effective in various forms of MS. This treatment is set to be available from 2017.
  • Multiple Sclerosis – Axon Degeneration

  • Damaged Nerve Fibers
    Researchers in Munich are using the latest microscopy techniques to investigate the mechanisms behind neural damage in multiple sclerosis. Using animal models, they have been able to demonstrate that aggressive free radicals cause damage to the fibers extending from nerve cells, but these go on to repair themselves once the renegade molecules have been neutralized.
  • Multiple Sclerosis – Immunology

  • A fine Line
    The cells of our immune system protect us from disease by attacking and destroying pathogens. Sometimes, though, they get it wrong and target the body’s own tissue. An autoimmune disease takes hold. Thomas Korn is researching ways to tame these misdirected immune cells, with a particular focus on multiple sclerosis.
  • Multiple Sclerosis – Molecular Neurobiology

  • Much more than Glue
    To function properly, our nervous system needs a substance called myelin, which surrounds and protects nerve fibers. If this myelin sheath is destroyed, as in multiple sclerosis (MS), the consequences are severe. Prof. Mikael Simons is researching how this protective insulating layer is formed – with the aim of improving treatment for MS patients.
  • Translational Medicine

  • From Bench to Bedside and Back
    Translational medicine – the close interaction of basic researchers and clinician scientists – is the key to rapid and efficient development of new diagnostics and therapies.
  • Clinical Science

  • How the Next Generation Furthers Insights while Healing Patients
    Clinician scientists work with patients as practicing physicians, while also pursuing scientific research in the lab. The huge time commitment this requires means fewer and fewer physicians are choosing this route. At the same time, it is becoming increasingly important for researching physicians to work in close collaboration with scientists – and for scientists to connect their research to diseases. Here, we take a look at TUM’s up-and-coming scientists engaged in multiple sclerosis research.
  • Neuroimaging

  • A Network View of the Brain
    The TUM-Neuroimaging Center is an interdisciplinary platform, bringing scientists together from a range of fields to advance neuroimaging research.
  • Alzheimer’s Research

  • On the Trail of Alzheimer’s
    Watching the brain’s neurons directly as they fire is a neuroscientist’s dream. And for several years now, TUM researchers have been able to do just that. What’s more, they are incorporating their methods into work relevant for patients, for instance in the field of Alzeheimer’s research – with findings that may hold the key to improving treatment.
  • Cognitive Systems

  • From Aid to Empowerment
    Patients with paraplegia have partially regained feeling in their legs after a year’s mobility training with an exoskeleton as part of the Walk Again Project. An artificial skin developed by Prof. Gordon Cheng played a key role here, enabling sensory feedback from the exoskeleton to the patient. Now, Cheng is teaming up with neurologists at TUM to explore how this type of training could help people with multiple sclerosis.
  • Medical Informatics

  • Big Data Improves our Understanding of Diseases
    Patients with paraplegia have partially regained feeling in their legs after a year’s mobility training with an exoskeleton as part of the Walk Again Project. An artificial skin developed by Prof. Gordon Cheng played a key role here, enabling sensory feedback from the exoskeleton to the patient. Now, Cheng is teaming up with neurologists at TUM to explore how this type of training could help people with multiple sclerosis.
  • Download

  • Full PDF – Gesamte Ausgabe als PDF (14,4 MB)
    Faszination Forschung, Heft 19 (2016) / Faszination Forschung, Edition 19 (2016)

contact: presse@tum.de

Corporate Communications Center

Redaktion Faszination Forschung

Tel.: +49.89.289.22561

 Mail

Ansprechpartner

Alle Ausgaben